Admission Process

Artal Prep is delighted to announce that we are now accepting registrations of interest for the 2020-2021 academic year for students from Reception age (age 4) through Year 4 (age 8)! Register your contact details today to get booked for a school tour and information session.

Artal accepts admissions on a rolling calendar and throughout the year. Admissions are not limited to semester terms.

Priority for enrollment decisions will be based on the following order

i

Student’s age is appropriate for her/his year group (see table below)

ii

Students who have a sibling or siblings already enrolled at Artal Prep

iii

Students who successfully meet the requirements of the school’s admissions assessments

iv

The date of the application

What Year Group Your Child Is Eligible For

Artal Age Group Comparative Academic Grade Age
Raindrops Nursery 1 6-12 Months
Clouds Nursery 2 12-24 Months
Sunshine Pre-Foundation Stage 2-3 Years
Explorers KG 1 3-4 Years
Reception KG 2 4-5 Years
First year KG 3, Foundation Stage of Kindergarten 5-6 Years
Second Year 1st Grade 6-7 Years
Third Year 2nd Grade 7-8 Years
Fourth Year 3rd Grade 8-9 Years
Fifth Year 4th Grade 9-10
Sixth Year 5th Grade 10-11
Seventh Year 6th Grade 11-12

Induction & Preparing Your Child

MEET THE TEACHER OPEN HOUSE NIGHT

The Thursday before the first day of school, our school lights up and opens its doors for families to come and meet your child’s new teacher, learn about our daily school routines, and explore the classrooms and facilities.

BACK TO SCHOOL BREAKFAST

Our first day of school kicks off welcoming families with a welcome breakfast event. Parents get to help their children settle into sharing a light meal then helping them settle into their new classrooms.

PARENT COFFEE MORNING

Parents are invited to attend our coffee morning induction event. This is your time to come learn about our daily routines, programs and opportunities, academic programs, and much more. Come and meet our Senior Leadership Team and ask any questions you may have about your child’s school. We hold coffee morning events throughout the year to keep parents well informed of the goings-on, upcoming events, and essential information.

Starting Pre-school

USE PRETEND PLAY TO EXPLORE THE IDEA OF PRESCHOOL

Take turns being the parent, child, and teacher. Act out common daily routines, such as saying good-bye to mommy and/or daddy, taking off your coat, singing songs, reading stories, having circle time, playing outside, and taking naps. Reassure your child that preschool is a good place where he/she will have fun and learn. Answer his her questions patiently. This helps children feel more in control which reduces their anxiety.

READ BOOKS ABOUT PRESCHOOL

There are many books about going to preschool that are available from the public library in your area. Choose several to share with your child over the summer before the school starts. Talk about the story and how the characters are feeling. Ask how your child is feeling.

MAKE A GAME OUT OF PRACTICING SELF-HELP SKILLS

These skills include unzipping his/her coat, hanging his/her coat on a hook, putting on his/her backpack, fastening his/her shoes. For example, you might want to have a “race” with your child to see how quickly he/she can put on his/her shoes. When you play school together, you can give your child the chance to practice taking off his/her coat, zipping his/her backpack closed, and sitting “criss-cross applesauce.

DURING THE 2 WEEKS BEFORE PRESCHOOL STARTS

Label all items—backpack, jacket, shoes, blanket, teddy bear, etc.—with your child’s name. Talk to your child about the morning and afternoon routine so that he/she understands that he/she will be safe, okay, and cared for. Start using your child’s “school bedtime.” Help your child get into a preschool schedule by keeping to his/her school bedtime, beginning about 2 weeks before school starts.

THE NIGHT BEFORE PRESCHOOL

Answer any last-minute questions from your child. Make sure that your child goes to bed on time. Pick a bedtime that gives your child a good night’s rest before the first day. Keep the bedtime routine soothing and relaxing. Don’t focus too much (or at all!) on the first day of school unless he/she wants to.

THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL

Wake up early enough so that you and your child don’t have to rush to get to preschool. Make breakfast for your child and, if possible, sit down to eat together—or at least talk with him/her as he/she eats and you get ready. Review the day’s routine (what preschool will be like, how your child will get to school/come home). Let your child choose a special stuffed animal or blanket to bring to school with him/her. These “loveys” can help children make the transition from home to school, and can also make nap time easier, too.

Saying Good-bye at Drop off

PLAN TO STAY A LITTLE WHILE

Staying for 15-30 minutes on that first morning can help ease the transition. Together, the two of you can explore the classroom, meet some other children, play with a few toys. When you see that your child is comfortable, it is time to leave. If he/she is having a harder time getting engaged, you may want to ask your child’s teacher to stay with your child as you say good-bye so that when you leave, he/she can turn to another caring adult for support.

KEEP YOUR TONE POSITIVE AND UPBEAT

Children pick up on the reactions of the trusted adults in their lives. So try not to look worried or sad, and don’t linger too long. Say a quick, upbeat good-bye and reassure your child that all will be well.

THINK ABOUT CREATING A SPECIAL GOOD-BYE ROUTINE

For example, you can give your child a kiss on the palm to “hold” all day long. Or, the two of you can sing a special song together before you leave. Good-bye routines are comforting to children and help them understand and prepare for what will happen next.

RESIST THE RESCUE

Try not to run back in the classroom if you hear your child crying, as upsetting as this can be. This is a big change and your child may, quite understandably, feel sad and a little scared. But if you run back in, it sends the message that he/she is only okay if you are there and it is likely to prolong your child’s distress and make it harder for him/her to adapt. Rest assured, teachers have many years of experience with helping families make the shift to preschool. Instead, you can wait outside the classroom for a few minutes to ensure that all is well, or call the school later in the morning to check in.

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